Content Links

Problems:

   Personal Development    Financial Solutions:
Site Links

Science of Success Schools

Understanding Addictions

Protecting the family by Defining, Understanding, and Controlling Addictions

We are freely providing this information because we believe that it can change lives. What follows is based on the understanding that we got of Addictions from our experiences in an Addiction Recovery Program where we frequently met with people suffering with addictions and their family members.

While we do not know if this information is 100% accurate. We are comfortable that it is at least a good starting point for anyone new to the subject.

We welcome any and all constructive comments or questions about the content, especially from anyone that is experiencing what is discussed here - Contact Us to tell us what you're thinking...
_________________________________________________________________________

Introduction
On Mar 23, 2016 my wife and I were invited to work in an Addiction Recovery Program by our church. When we began this work we did not understand what an addiction was or what it does to a person. Like most people, including those with addictions, we were very ignorant and thought in term of stereotypes.

During the ensuing 41 months that we served in this program we learned how how little we knew about addictions. For example, one of the first things we learned was to not to think of a person as an addict, but as a person with an addiction so as to not de-humanize the individual.

For example, when one thinks of someone as an alcoholic one tends to see them as a hopeless drunk without character or morals, not as a man with an addiction to alcohol who hasn’t had a drink in over 40 years and functions normally in society. When you understand that they are a fellow human being who happens to have a physical addiction to alcohol, this allows them to keep their humanity.

People with addictions are akin to people with a disease like cancer or diabetes.

The following videos illustrate this point. As you watch them, try to see the person who has been infected by an addiction and how it affected them:
Note: These are not actors, but the actual person who has agreed to being in the video.

Video - Meet Mark

Video - Meet Sidreis

We are going to take you on a journey through 22 FAQ’s about addictions and ask that you think about them in terms of Mark and Sidreis in the videos that you just watched and how they were suffering from having an addiction.

Addictions do not define who someone is, but who they are not!

Table of Contents
The following are the Frequently Asked Questions that are derived from our experiences in an Addiction Recovery Program:
  1. What is an addiction?
  2. How is an addiction different from a habit?
  3. Can an addiction be reversed?
  4. Why can’t people with addictions just say no?
  5. How many times can an addicted person relapse before there is no coming back?
  6. When does the healing start?
  7. What is one thing that should never be said to an individual or group?
  8. How can you help someone who has an addiction?
  9. What do you do when someone doesn’t want your help?
  10. Given that beating an addiction is so hard, where do they start?
  11. What addictions are covered in a program?
  12. Who can attend these meetings?
  13. What does a meeting look, feel, and sound like?
  14. How long does one need to attend these meetings before they are “fixed”?
  15. How does someone sign up for a meeting?
  16. What are the associated costs?
  17. Does this program work?
  18. How many youths and adults and hide because they have addictions?
  19. What can be done to prevent someone from becoming addicted?
  20. Why don't drug rehab program always work?
  21. How prevalent are addictions?
  22. How can one tell if someone has an addiction?
Answers
1. What is an Addiction?
A key point in dealing with addictions is to understand what they are, what causes them, and how they affect the person with an addiction. All addictions are the same in that they are more than a strong habit. They are the result of a permanent change in the brain’s chemistry like boiling an egg can't be undone.

One of the key aspects of an addiction is that the person has lost a portion of his or her moral agency and is incapable of “just saying no” the way a normal person can. To them, feeding their addiction may feel like a matter of life or death. An addiction physically drives someone’s actions to some degree:

I experienced this feeling one day when my blood sugars crashed while driving around town and I became desperate to get some carbohydrates into my system. Fortunately, most towns of any size have a number of carbohydrate rich sources spread around them called "Fast Food" and we pulled into one of them to order a burger and fries only to find ourself behind 4 or 5 cars.

I was beginning to feel that survival level desire for food as I sat behind those cars watching bags of food being handed to those with the good fortune to be in line in front of me. It was bad enough that I began imagining myself going into ninja mode and sneaking up to that window where those fries and sugary drinks were appearing and grabbing the next bag to appear. It was scary to realize that I was so desperate for food that I was seriously entertaining the idea to a small degree.

Because of the strength of that physical compulsion, a person with an addiction may go to great lengths to feed and/or hide the addiction.

The really scary thing is that one can become addicted to anything that provides enough of a rush to alter the brain chemistry. Besides the well-known addictions, we have heard of people who are addicted to the rush of getting angry. Addictions are a lot like cancer and diabetes in that sometimes they are self-inflicted by personal habits and sometimes they their cause is more environmental in nature like exposure to asbestos.

The important thing to understand is that an addiction compels one to behave a certain way and, as described above, this can be a survival level compulsion, which is as strong as it can get. Understanding this can help the person that has an addiction to better deal with the lack of control that they are feeling. It can also help the spouse, other family members, and friends to see the problem for what it is, but it does not give that person an excuse to act out -

Addictions Can Be Controlled!!!

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

2. How is an addiction different from a habit?
A habit is something one has trained their body to do to the point that it is often done without thinking about it. For example, a person who has worn glasses for a while has developed the habit of rubbing his eyes by sliding his hand under the glasses and will do that even when not wearing glasses because it’s a habit. Habits can be broken with relatively little effort.

It’s also “relatively” easy to “say no” to a habit and while it might feel odd to reach directly to you eye to rub it, it doesn’t require you to fight with everything you have against your body in order to do it. The struggle with a habit is only in the mind while an addiction creates what feels like a life or death struggle in both mind and body.

An addiction is a compulsion, analogous to when your body decides that you’re going to sneeze or yawn and like a yawn, often the best that one can do is to clench the mouth shut, but the yawn still happens. An addiction cannot be unlearned or broken like a habit can, but it can be conquered over time with great effort by learning how to control the urge.

Addictions do not define who someone is, but who they are not!!!

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

3. Can an addiction be reversed?
There was an anti-drug commercial several years ago in which a man held an egg in his hand and said, “This is your brain”. He then cracked the egg into a hot pan and we got to watch it change as it cooked. We then heard the man say, “This is your brain on drugs.”

This turns out to be a pretty good analogy of what an addiction does to the brain because as the heat changes the chemistry of the egg and an addiction changes the chemistry in the brain in such a way that it can't be undone in today’s world.

As we visited different groups, we learned of a man with an alcohol addiction who has been sober for more than 40 years, but still wakes up every day craving a drink. That’s over 15,000 days in a row that he went to his knees in prayer to find the strength to make it through another day.

The good news is that, like this man, anyone can conquer their addiction through determination, hard work, faith, and help from those that love him or her.

It’s important to keep in mind that an addiction like this man has is not the end of the world, but more like an illness that needs daily attention and care. There are many men and women who have powerful addictions, but still live full and complete lives because, like having diabetes, they have learned how to control it.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

4. Why can’t they just say no?
Addictions manifest themselves in the form of a compulsion. In essence the body thinks that it may die if the addiction isn't fed and is doing everything that it can to make that happen. It is incredibly hard to resist.

It’s not like saying no to a second serving of pie, but more like trying to say no to a sneeze or yawn that is already on its way, but worse.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

5. How many times can an addicted person relapse before there is no coming back?
There seems to be a universal belief among those with addictions that they’ve failed so many times that they are beyond the reach of forgiveness and reclamation. This is undoubtedly due to having made resolution after resolution to never do “it” again only to have the compulsion of the addiction pull them back in giving them a very real sense of failure and helplessness.

Some are “sober” for a week, a month, or even years only to relapse yet, once again, making them feel as if there is no hope for them. They often don’t understand the nature of addictions and believe that they should be able to “just say no” or quit cold-turkey so each relapse adds to their feeling of failure and helplessness.

We believe that the only limit to the number of retries one gets depends upon the individual. Relapses are ‘par for the course’ when dealing with addictions and are not a measure of failure. Failure only happens when someone irrevocably gives up on themselves. Success is is sometimes measured in small increments of improvement and determination.

The first lesson that someone with an addiction needs to learn is that no matter how many times they’ve relapsed, or will relapse in the future, that there is still hope as long as they are willing to keep trying.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

6. When does the healing start?
As soon as the affected person lets it.

I get that this sounds like a non-answer, but it is accurate because Attitude is everything and as long as a person with addictions doesn’t have the right attitude, nothing is going to happen. However, when that person humbles him or herself, begins to desire to conquer their addiction, and turn themselves over to the healing process, things begin to happen.

This means that they have to recognize that they have an addiction and that they want to do something about it. This doesn’t have to start out as a huge desire to change. Any amount of desire along with the realization that there is a problem is enough to start the healing process.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

7. What is one thing that should never be said to an individual or group?
A kiss-of-death statement from someone talking in general about addictions to an individual or group is “I know that ‘you aren’t’ / ‘no one in this group is’ having a problem with…”

While you may want this to be true, it may not be where individuals are involved and probably isn’t when you have 3 or more individuals in a group. Addictions are much more common than we tend to believe and making that statement to someone who has a problem will inevitably shame him or her so badly that he or she won’t want to talk with you or anyone else about it.

Always assume that you are, or may be, talking to someone with an addiction. Let people know that it’s an affliction, not the end of the world, and that there is help. Addictions are a lot like cancer and diabetes in that sometimes they are self-inflicted by personal habits and sometimes they their cause is more environmental in nature like exposure to asbestos and lots of good people have them.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

8. How can you help someone who has an addiction?
Perhaps the best place to start is to not do anything that may drive them deeper into the addiction such as berating or humiliating them. The problem is that the discovery that a loved one has an addiction can be so devastating that the shocked reaction can be very hard to control and one may want to lash out in his or her pain.

This seems to be especially true when the nature of the addiction is sexual. This is why we’ve started out by trying to explain the nature of addictions so that people might not equate the addiction with the person and then be able to show love, compassion, and patience with him or her.

For example, a husband’s pornography addiction has nothing to do with his wife or how well she has performed her “wifely” duties. He is addicted to the rush that pornography gives him, which isn’t a replacement for his wife and the sooner the wife can get past that the better the chances are that the marriage will survive. He is probably as disgusted by what he’s doing as she is.

After our time in an Addiction Recovery Program we’ve come to realize addictions are very complex and the injured party needs to really understand them before acting too rashly and perhaps irreparably aggravating the situation. It’s also important that the afflicted individual understand that letting your loved ones know that you have an addiction may require time and space for them to absorb the shock, especially when it is sexual in nature.

Spouses, families, and friends need to understand what it means to be addicted and that the addiction has robbed the afflicted person of a portion of his or her moral agency. In short, it isn’t as simple as just saying “no”.

It’s important to understand that many people with addictions are already very ashamed of themselves and what their addiction is causing them to do, so berating or humiliating may drive them deeper into despair and self-loathing and is almost always NOT an answer.

Try to treat the afflicted person like they have just told you that they have cancer by separating the addiction from the individual. Nobody thinks that cancer and its symptoms define the person, but rather that they are something that the person needs your help dealing with.

Don’t take addictions personally. They compel people to act in ways that they would NOT otherwise act. An addiction doesn’t define who a person is, but who they are not.

I watched a close friend of mine who was older and had always been a pillar of morality start lying and shopping around her prescription after she “accidentally” got hooked on pain-killers. This wasn’t who she was, but the addiction made it feel like a matter of survival for her to get more pills so she did something that she would never have done just two months earlier, she lied to people.

Is that diabetic you know a mean person or is his or her low sugar resulting in them being angry? If you can separate the illness from the person then you’ll know to get them something to eat rather than being offended and getting mad at them.

If you can remember that someone with addictions is fighting demons that you can’t even imagine then maybe you can show them the love and compassion that they need to heal.

Unfortunately, not everyone with an addiction is ready to confront it. One should never be an enabler because addictions can be very controlling and may require everything that a person has to give in order to overcome it and giving in to their addiction can erode their resolve. Know that you have the right to lovingly set expectations and consequences.

No spouse, family member or friend should ever condone immoral, abusive, or other disruptive behaviors. Calculated tough-love may be the answer when the person is not willing to try to start changing.

It is also acceptable to remove someone, who is actively trying to change, from the home until they are able to exhibit a reasonable level of behavior and demeanor. Doing so may give them more incentive to control the addiction.

It is important to let the person afflicted with an addiction know that they are loved, but there are consequences for not working to conquer the addiction or not having sufficient control to be in the home. Encourage the addicted person, spouses, family, etc., to go to group meetings to get the help that is key to healing.

(Note - Family and spousal support groups are as important as the 12 step meetings for those with addictions. Click Here to download a free 12 Step study manual.

IMPORTANT - Expect relapses!!! It’s nothing personal and it’s not necessarily that they aren’t trying really hard, but that just saying no isn’t an option for them, anymore. They are fighting against their body, which thinks ignoring the addiction could kill it and the body can be very compelling.

Understand what addictions are and what they do to a person so that you can be more sympathetic and loving to the person with an addiction and those affected by it, but don’t be an enabler.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

9. What do you do when someone doesn’t want your help?
Unfortunately, not everyone with an addiction is ready to confront their addiction. Regardless, one should never be an enabler because addictions can be tough to control and giving in to their addiction can be counter productive. Know that you have the right to lovingly set expectations and consequences.

No spouse, family member or friend should ever condone immoral, abusive, or other disruptive behaviors.

Calculated tough-love may be required when the person is not willing to try to start changing and may require removing them from the home until they exhibit a reasonable level of behavior and demeanor.

It is important to let the person afflicted with an addiction know that they are loved, but there are consequences for not working to conquer the addiction or not having sufficient control to be in the home.

Understand what addictions are and what they do to a person so that you can be more sympathetic and loving to the person with an addiction and those affected by it, but don’t be an enabler.

How you approach someone who isn't ready to deal with their problem is case-by-case and will probably require getting help figuring out the best approach.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

10. Given that beating an addiction is so hard, where do they start?
It is all about attitude. The addicted person has to be in the right mindset to have any chance of success because the road ahead will be very difficult and full of temptations to give up.

Unfortunately, this change of attitude often doesn’t come before hitting rock bottom and realizing they’re at the point of or have already lost everything of any value to them.

Step 1 is to admit to themselves that they have an addiction.

Conquering an addiction is rarely something that can be done alone.

Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) meetings are a valuable resource. You can locate local meetings that are Free to anyone 18 and older by Clicking Here

Upon getting the right attitude, the addicted person can begin using the 12 step program offered below and go through it as many times as it takes.

Click Here to download a free 12 Step study manual.

Be assured that anyone can conquer an addiction because we’ve seen many people do it. These people are often at these meetings where they share their experiences, show understanding, and mentor the “new guys”.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

11. title
Given that all addictions are essentially the same thing, a chemical change in the brain, most programs can cover all “addictions”. However, because of the sensitive nature of addictions like Pornography and the need to help spouses and families, it is a good idea to address each demographic through different types of groups.

The program that we were affiliated with has the following groups:
  • Gender specific PASG (Pornography Addiction Support Group) group meetings exclusively for men OR exclusively for women with a Pornography addiction
  • Mixed gender General Addiction group meetings for men and/or women with a non-pornography/sex addiction problem
  • Gender specific Spousal/Family support groups for men OR women with pornography addictions
  • Mixed gender Spousal/Family support groups for men and/or women with non-pornography addicted family members (any addiction other than pornography/sex addictions)
Click Here to see a Faith-Based Addiction Recovery Program that is Free to anyone 18 and older. Click on the "Find A Meeting" button to find a local or virtual meeting.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

12. Who can attend these meetings?
Any addicted person 18 and older who is willing to abide by the covenants of the group is welcome to attend these meetings. A referral is not required and they do not have to be a member of this faith.

However, attending one of these meetings simply out of curiosity is highly discouraged for reasons of anonymity and you may not be allowed in.

It is strongly suggested that you contact the Group Leader(s) for more information about the group meeting before you attend for the first time.

Youths, ages 16 and 17, may attend with their same gender parent or authorized adult. The adult needs to be “registered” with “Family Services” before attending, but that typically only requires filling out a form. Get the needed information how to get registered and an OK to bring a youth to the meeting from the Group Leaders.

Click Here to learn more about this Addiction Recovery Program. Click on the "Find A Meeting" button to find a local or virtual meeting.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

13. What does a meeting look, feel, and sound like?
Anonymity is key to this program so they are typically only be attended by “those with addictions”, a Facilitator, and the ARP Missionaries. However, sometimes there are individuals that need a friend to come with them, but anyone that attends a meeting needs to know that the meeting is to be a safe place where someone can talk about their problem without being judged or fearing exposure to the outside world. We can't stress this enough!!!

It would be a good idea for anyone who doesn't have a real problem, but wants to attend a meeting, to contact the Group Leader for permission, first.

Attending one of these meetings simply out of curiosity is highly discouraged for reasons of anonymity and you won't be allowed in if the group feels uncomfortable with you being there.

We try to keep location quiet such as in order to protect anonymity, but not everyone has gotten that memo.

An person with an addiction doesn’t need to get a referral or permission in order to attend and we don’t talk about who is attending meetings, even if asked.

The 12 step program is based on the alcoholics anonymous program, but has been rewritten in the words of a group of recovering members of this faith, who have addictions. Everyone should possess, read, and use the guide, even if not addicted, because there is undoubtedly someone in their life that is.

Click Here to download a free 12 Step study manual.

Use it and videos on the website to teach your family and to better protect your children against addictions. Review topic number 7, (What is one thing that should never be said to an individual or group?) about what not to say to your children before you start doing this.

The following is an excellent video about what a meeting is like in this particular Addiction Recovery Program: Click Here to see the video.

Click Here to learn more about the Faith-Based Addiction Recovery Program that we worked in and that is Free to anyone 18 and older. Click on the "Find A Meeting" button to find a local or virtual meeting.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

14. How long does one need to attend these meetings before they are “fixed”?
This totally depends on the person, but most people need to continuously work some form of the program for their entire lives because you can’t un-cook the egg.

We know of individuals that thought they were better and left the program after being sober for years only to relapse within just a few weeks.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

15. How does someone sign up for a meeting?
xxx

There is no signing up. Any addicted person 18 and older who is willing to abide by the covenants of the group is welcome to attend these meetings. A referral is not required and they do not have to be a member of this faith.

It is strongly suggested that they contact the Group Leader(s) for more information about the group meeting before you attend for the first time.

Click Here and then click on the "Find A Meeting" button to get the Group-Leader's contact information.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

16. What are the associated costs?
xxx

Depending on where one is attending, one may be asked to cover the cost of the book ($1.00), but most programs provide the new attendee with the book so the meetings are typically free to attend.

You can download a PDF version of this guide by Clicking Here.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

17. Does this program work?
It has been successful in helping everyone learn how control their addiction who has worked the program faithfully for as long as needed. We have seen people who thought they were going to die face down in the gutter from drugs who are now some of the happiest people you’ll ever meet.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

18. How many youths and adults hide because they have addictions?
Someone with an addiction may very likely still have a deep desire to belong and be part of something, but has alienated him or herself solely because of the addiction.

We have heard it said that nearly 40% of the general population has an addiction of some kind.

Having an addiction does not automatically make someone stupid or a loner, but may cause them to hide for several reasons, such as:
  • Their desire to pursue and feed their addiction and have no time for anything else,
  • Their fear of being found out,
  • Their feelings of shame or a deep feeling self-loathing and feelings of unworthiness,
  • A belief that they’ve fallen back into the addiction so many times that they are beyond redemption.
Understanding the difference between someone with an addiction and someone who is a loner is significant. The addicted person may not respond to attempts to draw them out, but rather need help rebuilding their feelings of self-worth, which is a totally different approach.

So please start looking at loners in light that some of them may have an addiction so that you can look for ways to deal with addictions as opposed to fixing socially awkwardness. You’ll never get those with addictions back without understanding their addiction and making adjustments so that you can reach them, too.

Pay particular attention to people that used to be socially active, but abruptly dropped out of sight.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

19. What can be done to prevent someone from becoming addicted?
This is a tough one to answer because addictions come from so many sources and all too often happen on the first exposure. The best thing one can do is to avoid any situation where one might be exposed to drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and especially pornography. This is not an easy thing to do in this world when the addiction could come from something as simple as a pain prescription.

I recently sat with a couple who are both addicted to alcohol, but have it under control. They are running a home for others with the same addictions and appear to be intelligent and thoughtful people. They offered up a plausible theory that people who aren’t connected (e.g., loners or just alone) are more likely to become addicted.

They told me that a Grandma who is getting painkillers during a hospital isn't likely to become addicted to them if her family is surrounding her during her stay so she feels connected. However, someone who is alone in the same situation has a greater chance of becoming addicted because he or she is feeling alone and disconnected.

If this is true, then one way to avoid addictions is to keep your family close so neither you, nor they, feel disconnected.

It also suggests that getting people reconnected might do a lot to help them beat an addiction. I don’t know accurate this theory is, but I a friend of ours who got hooked on pain killers was living alone during her convalescence.

If you have children, we suggest that you be real careful about sleep overs. We’ve had children exposed to pornography at sleepovers in homes where you wouldn’t expect that to happen.

The longer that you can put off their exposure to addictive behaviors, the better it will be for them.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

20. Why don't drug rehab program always work?
xxx

You hear of celebrities going in and out of these programs with little success. Daryl Strawberry, one of the greatest baseball players to ever live, had a cocaine addiction that these programs couldn’t fix and he was eventually kicked out of professional baseball.

While the “drying-out” process may help someone get themselves under better control, it is key for a person with an addiction to find a personal foundation, a powerful why, from which to fight the addiction.

Simply “drying” someone out does not remove the addiction because you can’t un-cook the egg. The afflicted person needs something that is greater than the attraction of the addiction.

For example, we learned of a man who despite having an alcohol addiction has been sober for over 40 years. However, despite his sobriety, he has woken up every morning of those 40 years, some 15,000 consecutive days, craving a drink, so while being sober helps him, it hasn’t stopped his cravings.

However, because he has a Gospel foundation, he has started every one of those days on his knees asking God for the strength to make it through one more day. His Why and his faith have successfully countered his craving over fifteen thousand times.

Daryl Strawberry eventually hit rock bottom, then found a wonderful woman to love and who loved him, and a mission that gave him the strength to get control of his addiction. He is happier now than when he was making millions playing baseball.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

21. How prevalent are addictions?
We’re not really sure, but we’ve heard numbers as high as 40% of the population having some form of addiction and opioids have seriously added to this number.

We were in the life insurance business a few years back when life expectancies had gotten so much longer that it had become possible for someone to either get more coverage for what they were already paying or pay less for the same coverage even though they were 10 years older.

However, because of this new opioid epidemic life expectances have dropped dramatically in the 20 to 50 age range due to drug overdoses. It can be safely said that addictions are at epidemic proportions.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

22. How can one tell if someone has an addiction?
There is no clear cut answer to this question, but there are several things that may be a tip-off such as: troubles at home, work, school, with the law, etc.; withdrawing from friends and family; an unexpected or unexplained drop in social activity; and/or keeping secrets - all stemming from sudden and often drastic changes in behavior.

Basically, an addiction changes an individual’s life by becoming as important as life or death to him or her. Job, education, family, friends, morality, integrity, activity, etc. all take a back seat to feeding the addiction.

I personally heard an individual describe how his father had once been an international success, but that his success quickly began to erode and over time he lost his job, his marriage, and is now working at Home Depot.

As I listened to this description of a man’s life falling apart I saw all sorts of addiction related red flags, which were eventually verified when he mentioned the evils of pornography.

His father's addiction to pornography had become so important to him that he was no longer willing to leave it alone long enough to do those things that had made him successful in business and in his marriage.

His need to feed the addiction was so powerful that he was willing to give up everything that used to be important to him so he’d have time for what now seemed as important as life or death.

This suggests that you should seriously consider the possibility that someone suddenly struggling with their way of life, job, schooling, family, friends, etc. may have an addiction.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

nnn. title
xxx

Click Here to download a free 12 Step study manual.

Click Here to learn more about the Faith-Based Addiction Recovery Program that we worked in and that is Free to anyone 18 and older. Click on the "Find A Meeting" button to find a local or virtual meeting.

Click here to go back to the Table of Contents

This page is under construction and will be added to as quickly as possible.


Contact Us for more information!!!
 
Your Assurance Team/Science of Success: Where real Success is the only measure of Success!
Better Information -> Better Thinking -> Better Results!!!
Contact Us | Who We Are | Privacy Policy

© 2012 all rights reserved.